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A Royal Makeover at Amalienborg in Denmark

July 2, 2013 DESTINATION No Comments Email Email

On July 5th, Amalienborg opens its doors with new exhibition design and a broader scope. 

The gala hall and the royal chambers of representation at the Palace of Christian VIII at Amalienborg will be open to the public on Saturdays. Exceptions can occur, when the Royal house uses the premi

The gala hall and the royal chambers of representation at the Palace of Christian VIII at Amalienborg will be open to the public on Saturdays. Exceptions can occur, when the Royal house uses the premi

Amalienborg is the heart of the Danish monarchy. The museum offers a unique opportunity to visit a living castle, where the rooms of former kings are furnished exactly as they were when the kings were alive. Presenting Amalienborg and the royal dynasty through new means of communication has long been a great wish of ours. The purpose of the new exhibition design is to give visitors an insight into life at the castle, historically and at present.

The zenith of the new communication design is a large, impressive exhibition model in chiseled corian. It is surmounted with an exact replica architecture model of the Amalienborg castle complex, which lights up in key points of interest. Below are immersed iPads, which give visitors a chance to select the stories they prefer to zoom in on and explore further.

Previously, the exhibition has focused on the lives of the former royals and their art treasures, however, we are now launching a wider scope, and a part of the museum is now devoted to royal life at present – what are the rolls and tasks of a royal in the 21st century?

Amalienborg with the Palace of Christian VIII to the right.

Amalienborg with the Palace of Christian VIII to the right.

The extended scope also includes the architecture and construction of Amalienborg and the district surrounding it called “Frederiksstaden”. The lay-out of 18th century Frederiksstaden represents a highlight in Danish European Rococo architecture. Its landmark is the giant equestrian statue of Frederik V created by the Frenchmen Jacques-François-Joseph Saly (1717– 1776). He was regarded as the best horse sculptor of his time and it took him 14 years to complete the statue, which ended up costing more than the four palaces altogether.

FACTS on the museum:
The Danish Royal Collection’s department at Amalienborg is a continuation of the museum at Rosenborg Castle and opened in 1994. The museum presents the Glücksborgian royal house, which was founded by Christian IX and Queen Louise, her Majesty the Queen’s great-great-grandparents. The studies of four former kings are left intact as is the private drawing room of Queen Louise (1817-98). In other rooms, former art objects related to the royal family, including Fabergé pieces, are exhibited.

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