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BA A380 great flood mirrors Qantas A380 great lake

March 22, 2016 Headline News No Comments Print Print Email Email

egtmedia59A great flood cascading through a British Airways Airbus A380 aircraft on the way to London from Johannesburg resembles the waterfall that ran through a Qantas plane of the same type as it flew between Los Angeles and Melbourne in 2014.

The BA flood happened when when a water leak in the upper passenger deck rained into the lower-deck cabin halfway through the flight, causing “chaos” according to passengers on the flight last week.

The flight was 90 minutes away from landing at Heathrow, the Aviation Herald reported.

The electrical systems in the cabin were turned off and the water cascaded through the ceiling and the air conditioning into the lower deck.

Mopping up after the BA flood. A pic posted on Twitter by @NicoGausserand

Mopping up after the BA flood. A pic posted on Twitter by @NicoGausserand

“The crew began putting blankets on the floor. We saw that it was chaos and [they] were overwhelmed by the situation,” passenger Nicolas Gausserand told Ladepeche.fr.

The Aviation Herald reported: “Cabin crew were able to contain the leak about 15 minutes later and began to dry up the water in the cabins with towels and blankets all over the floors. The flight was continued to London for a safe landing.”

A British Airways spokesman said: “A trolley knocked a water pipe and unfortunately it caused a leak on Sunday. Not serious but inconvenient.

“There was no risk to the aircraft or customers on board. The aircraft landed normally at Heathrow, and we’re sorry for the inconvenience to customers.”

In July 2014, Qantas flight QF94 from Los Angeles to Melbourne, operated by an A380 Airbus, turned back about an hour into the 14-hour flight after a cascade of water gushed like a river down the aisle into economy from a leaking business class pipe.

Passengers used blankets to shield themselves from drips. The striking picture shown here did the rounds of social media at the time, depicting the aisle looking like a river, or a creek at least.

'Great lake' on Qantas A380 in 2014

‘Great lake’ on Qantas A380 in 2014

Qantas said the water came from the plane’s drinking water supply (rather than from any less pleasant source). It ran from the business class cabin on the upper deck through the roof into the economy cabin below.

A report into the Qantas incident by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) blamed mops for the incident.

Rope-style mops used by cleaners may have contributed to a water coupling coming undone, the ATSB said.

Written by Peter Needham

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