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Boeing reduces its 747-8 Build Program

October 28, 2013 Aviation No Comments Email Email

If you’ve ever flown in a Boeing 747-8 you’ve flown on the biggest passenger plane in the world. Now, the chances of you enjoying a flight in this 4 engine aircraft are temporarily reduced as Boeing have announced that they are slowing down production of their biggest model ever to take to the skies.

The aircraft manufacturer has revealed that they will be adjusting their 747-8 production rate from 1.75 planes to 1.5 planes per month through to 201,5 as the demand for newly built large passenger and freight crafts has diminished considerably. The recovering economy has had an influence on the airline industry and although there is renewed optimism and the market is recovering, minor cutbacks to the Boeing build program have been necessary.

Boeing Commercial Airplanes 747 General Manger and Vice President, Eric Lindblad says that the production adjustment is in alignment with current demand and a stabilised production flow has allowed for the program reduction. Lindblad also added that although there was an adjustment to production rate it in no way compromised Boeing’s commitment to the program or their confidence in the capabilities of the aircraft, and that it was not expected to have a significant financial impact.

The Boeing 747-8 is not only a large aircraft, it is also considered one of the most comfortable and passengers are able to relax and enjoy the extra space whilst they watch in –flight movies, play iPhone casino games, read or sleep. The comfort factor is enhanced by the 747-8 being 30% quieter than most aeroplanes and airlines have benefited from its improved fuel efficiency, low operating costs, greater passenger and cargo capacity and reduced emissions.

To date, 107 orders have been placed for the 747-8 and 56 have been delivered to airlines around the world. The first delivery at the newly scheduled production rate is expected early in 2014 when economic forecasters predict that the air cargo market will pick up once again. Global demand for large airplanes is expected to grow over the next 20 years with an estimated 760 aircrafts being built in this period. The value of these crafts will exceed $280 billion and Boeing, regardless of their reduced build program, already has a head start in production.

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